Sails & Canvas

Tubular webbing slides over the buckle in this DIY clew strap, protecting the boom from scratches and dings.

A Custom-fitted Clew Strap

Velcro, buckle, or hitch? PS compares the pros and cons of each approach.

After settling on the material, one of the most basic mainsail design questions is whether to have an attached foot or loose-foot. A sail with an attached foot, secured to the boom with a bolt rope or sail slugs, has a small advantage in area, while a loose footed sail is easier to adjust (flat for windward work and smooth seas, fuller for reaching and rough seas), slightly cheaper to fabricate, and much easier to take off the boom for storage. Both are used on both high performance and cruising boats. Most new mainsails are loose footed.

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