Product Update July 2019 Issue

Inflatable PFDs Won’t Save You Without Proper Care and Use

Mark Bologna, a safety expert at Landfall Navigation in Stamford, Connecticut surveys the retailer’s large assortment of personal flotation devices.

I recently interviewed Mark Bologna of Landfall Navigation. He’s a safety expert, major supporter of safety training and has decades worth of experience selecting and servicing inflatable PFD’s. The first thing I asked Mark was whether or not I was overly concerned about the inflatable lifejacket issues mentioned above. His unequivocal “No”, and follow up advocacy for training and regular gear inspections paralleled most of the opinions above.

Among his comments about inflatable PFDs, was the tale of a client who came to Landfall with a ten-year-old inflatable PFD—wondering if it was time to buy a new one. Mark asked if he had been regularly inspecting the device and the owner said no because it had never been immersed. He peeled open the Velcro sealed cover, unfolded the bladder and exposed an auto inflator that looked okay—the only thing missing was the CO2 cartridge! The manual indicated that, just like when buying a new flashlight, the energy source had to be installed.

Fortunately, PFD never had to be used. It’s one of the reasons that the industry is moving toward better labeling and easy to read indicators depicting inflatable readiness. If you have an older inflation system (no indicator), unscrew and check the CO2 cylinder’s end seal and replace the bobbin or tablet. If you have a hydrostatic inflation system, check the indicator along with the replacement date.

Some manufacturers offer DIY replacement kits, while others recommend/require that an authorized service center does the work. Refer to your owner’s manual for details, and if you do your own hydrostatic inflator installation, when finished, orally inflate the life jacket and 12-18 hours later, make sure that there’s been no air loss.

A tragic MOB incident in the 2018 Chicago Mac Race, drove home Mark’s advice about equipment awareness. As with many accidents, there were several contributing factors that led to the death of Jon Santarelli, a crew member aboard the sloop Imedi. The breeze was up, the TP-52 had a mainsail with no reef points, and when all was said and done the crew had made three close proximity passes in an attempt to recover Santarelli.

Too much mainsail area and too much boat speed contributed to the outcome. But so did the failure of the PFD worn by the victim. It was an SSM model with a hydrostatic inflator, that was apparently over 10 years old. It was one of 13 that belonged to the boat’s owner. Whether or not the inflator had been replaced, or Santarelli had done any pool training with the jacket is unknown. But what is apparent, is that when he went over the side, the auto-inflation feature failed. And for some reason, the pull cord manual inflation function was not used nor was the oral inflation option exercised.

Jon Santerelli’s body was recovered a week later, but for some reason the medical examiner did not retain the life jacket in question for USCG inspection. Instead, it was cremated along with the victim. Important clues regarding what went wrong disappeared. But one fact became apparent. During the cremation, heat caused the life jacket’s CO2 cylinder to burst it’s seal outward indicating that the CO2 cylinder had a charge, the auto inflation mechanism had failed and the manual pull tab linkage had either never been used or also malfunctioned. The destruction of the life jacket prior to a professional inspection leaves many questions unanswered.

Comments (7)

The oral inflation suggested has the risk , if repeatedly practiced, to introduce in the bladder some amount of vapours and then liquids from the human breathing cycle, though I don't know which kind of consequences could affect the bladder after some years. I don't believe it is a good pratice. I prefer to use a mechanical inflator.

Posted by: albatrosbis | June 30, 2019 3:31 PM    Report this comment

Joseph, the Salus Coastal was the closest I have found to what you are looking for when I was looking a few years ago. Despite their statement "Optional Leg Harness to comply with new 2014 ISAF offshore regulations" it does not have enough flotation to meet the regulations.

Posted by: Stephen EC | June 29, 2019 5:32 PM    Report this comment

"...Imedi. The breeze was up, the TP-52 had a mainsail with no reef points, and when all was said and done the crew had made three close proximity passes in an attempt to recover Santarelli."

The captain caused the death and should be in prison. The main and jib should have been dropped, depowered or the sheets just let fly and the engine immediately started.

Three attempts to recover under sail is absolutely unacceptable.

The FIRST thing you do in a MOB situation is START THE ENGINE. Then you stop the boat and reverse course.

Three failed attempts to recover a MOB is the actions of an incompetent captain.

NO DAM RACE IS WORTH A LIFE.

Posted by: rav555 | June 29, 2019 11:34 AM    Report this comment

"The only thing inflatables are a better option than is not wearing any PFD at all......"

And that is often the case when sailing en passage. A non-inflatable is intolerable for hours and hours on end when the weather is over 100 F and humid. Fine for racing or a fishing trip but a high quality inflatable is preferred because it will be worn. Especially one that is very comfortable with maybe 290N inflation.

Checking your inflatable DAILY before going on deck just needs to be part of your safety lexicon.

Posted by: rav555 | June 29, 2019 9:50 AM    Report this comment

"The only thing inflatables are a better option than is not wearing any PFD at all......"

And that is often the case when sailing en passage. A non-inflatable is intolerable for hours and hours on end when the weather is over 100 F and humid. Fine for racing or a fishing trip but a high quality inflatable is preferred because it will be worn. Especially one that is very comfortable with maybe 290N inflation.

Checking your inflatable DAILY before going on deck just needs to be part of your safety lexicon.

Posted by: rav555 | June 29, 2019 9:50 AM    Report this comment

I am a broken record on this but the basic concept of inflatable PFD's is flawed for recreational sailors - they fail the first rule of engineering: Keep It Simple Stupid. They are fine for airplanes and Navy ships where you have a trained safety officer who can maintain them. I embraced these when they first came out, and still currently use one, but I am now searching for non-inflatable replacements. Any suggestions for ones that are offshore rated, reasonably comfortable, and have attachment points for your lifeline tether? The only thing inflatables are a better option than is not wearing any PFD at all...

Posted by: Joseph | June 29, 2019 9:10 AM    Report this comment

Why are NON-Coast Guard approved PFD's sold in the United States? I am talking about some Crewsaver and Spinlock PFD's. If a non-certified flotation device is illegal to use then it should not be legal to even import.

Posted by: rav555 | June 29, 2019 8:53 AM    Report this comment

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