February 2017 | Boat Review

E42 Build is Typical for Charter Trade

The Endeavour 42 is relatively heavily built to charter-boat scantlings, but inconsistencies between hulls means there will be some variability in quality. The biggest refit challenge is the fuel tank.   More...

Carl Alberg’s Ageless Commander

In the early 1960s, building boats designed by Carl Alberg, Philip Rhodes and Bill Tripp, Pearson Yachts was on a roll. The Alberg-designed Triton had been the catalyst; its debut at the 1959 New York Boat Show had been a runaway hit, and by 1964 it was all hands on deck at the former textile mill in Bristol, R.I. Beyond filling many orders for the 28-foot Triton, the Pearson factory was producing–often at the rate…   More...

A Deck Level View of the Pearson Commander

Freeboard on the Commander is somewhat low (top), which sometimes makes for a wet, but exciting ride in bumpy conditions.The generous cockpit featured on the Commander realistically seats six while under sail, but will accommodate more while at anchor with the tiller folded up. The cockpit is self-draining, but could use larger drains. Anyone with offshore aspirations will want to better seal the main hatch and lazarette.If you need to move forward quickly in a…   More...

The Sailing Skiff that Fits in a Locker

Subscribers Only — Sailing a cruising boat is many things—rewarding, sometimes adventurous, and often relaxing—but seldom viscerally fun, not in the way that a beach cat or performance dinghy saturates the senses and puts you in touch with the wind and waves. It doesn’t communicate every ripple and puff, it doesn’t thrill, and it doesn’t allow you to push the edge. It’s the difference between driving a Winnebago and riding a bicycle. For many of us, our love of sailing began with something fast and volatile, and by-and-by, we miss it dearly. And yet as much as we’d like to strap a Laser or Hobie to the foredeck, that’s not happening.   More...

4 Types of Pocket Cruisers

The recent release of Steve Wystrach’s outstanding documentary film Manry at Sea about Robert Manry, the former copy editor who sailed across the Atlantic in a 13-foot sailboat, got me thinking again about the virtues of small cruising boats. In my view, there are at least four main types of pocket cruisers. Manry’s modified lake boat fits somewhere in between the first two.   More...

Diving into the Endeavour 42

Just as the Caribbean cruising dream was at its peak in the American consciousness, Endeavour yachts brought in America’s Cup designer Johan Valentijn to create a new breed of Endeavours to compete with an already crowded field of center-cockpit cruisers, most of them bound for the Caribbean charter trade. The end result was a boat that managed to maintain a surprisingly tolerable aesthetic, unlike the typical “wedding-cake” center cockpit cruiser. The combination of teak trim, bootstripe, and balanced proportions camouflages what is essentially a floating condo.   More...

Corsair F-24 Boat Test

Subscribers Only — In May 1999 Practical Sailor reviewed the then-new Corsair F-24 Mark II trimaran. Nearly 20 years later, we’re here to follow up with a focus on the Corsair F-24 Mark I, a boat that can represent a good value today since many newer designs have entered the market.   More...

Sailboat Sea Trial

A test sail is a great way to weed out the painted vixens before spending your hard earned cash on a marine survey. Sure, you could ride around with a Mimosa in one hand while the broker regales you with tales of far away, exotic lands, but a smarter move would be to approach your test sail with planning and a critical eye. Here’s how to glean as much info as possible about your potential purchase during a test sail.   More...

Sailboat Test: Bruce King Ericson 34

Subscribers Only — To begin with, let’s make clear which Ericson 34 we’re reviewing about here because Ericson Yachts has a handful of boats in the 35-foot range. Back in 1967, the first Ericson 35 was a typical Cruising Club of America cruising boat, with a long keel and attached rudder. In 1978, an IOR-inspired Ericson 34 was introduced along with the 34T (same hull with a different deck). The boat we are describing here was built by Ericson and then by Pacific Seacraft, post 1991, where it evolved into the new Ericson 35.   More...

The Best Kayak Paddle and Stroke

A paddle should be selected with the same care you buy a shoe, since it is your connection to the water. For long-term cruising a spare may be good idea. A good economical choice is the Aquabound Manta Ray Fiberglass (about $100).   More...

Selling Your Boat without a Broker

Subscribers Only — I’m not anti-broker. I’ve happily used agents buying and selling boats and houses. They serve a valuable function, bringing buyers and sellers together, managing the viewings for out-of-town and busy owners, and generally helping the transaction go smoothly. They can serve as go between during negotiations, inspections, and formalities. But they also represent a large expense in a transaction, generally 10 percent by default, though this may be negotiated lower (potentially with a reduction in service).   More...

What You Should Expect from a Boat Broker

Subscribers Only — If you decide to work with a broker, remember that you have options. A broker’s fee is always 10 percent upon the sale of the boat, but some offer more services than others for the same price. Brokers asking you for funds up front should be immediately discounted.   More...

Flim-flam Artists Prey Upon Sellers and Buyers

Subscribers Only — You will get crank requests for information. The most dangerous are those offering to buy the boat sight unseen. For example, the person described below has not seen the boat “perfect” since I had not shown the boat and had only cleaned it of clutter that day. The most obvious protections are to meet face-to-face, and to accept payment by wire transfer or cash only, since cashier’s checks can be counterfeit. Use the services of a documentation and title company for larger boats. If a cashier’s check is the only practical means, do not release the property until the check has cleared.   More...

Multihull Special Report

Subscribers Only — In Part 1 of our special report on multihulls we scrutinized the implications of stability and the benefits derived form a wide stance, buoyancy and hull shape of multihulls. This time we’ll look at structural issues and the energy transfer that takes place due to a multihull’s impressive initial resistance to heel. We will also delve into what all this means for the rig, rigging, hull structure and hardware interfaces.   More...